B.D. Wong

Details
B.D. WONG’s first book, Following Foo (the electronic adventures of the Chestnut Man), published by HarperCollins, will be available May 13th wherever books are sold. It chronicles the dramatic and theatrical E-mail correspondence he initiated with nearly a thousand friends, family, loved ones (and even “forwarded strangers”) after the extremely premature birth of identical twin sons brought his family to the foreign and terrifying environment of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at a world-class teaching hospital. Mr. Wong can currently be seen on NBC’s Law & Order: Special Victims Unit as forensic psychiatrist Dr. George Huang. Series regular roles include HBO’s first one-hour drama, OZ, where Mr. Wong played Father Ray Mukada, Oswald Penitentiary’s conflicted and beleaguered prison chaplain. He has guest starred on X- Files, Sesame Street, and Chicago Hope, as well as appearing in HBO’s film version of Randy Shilts’ book And the Band Played On. He also co-starred with comic Margaret Cho on her series All- American Girl as a member of television’s first Asian-American family when the ABC situation comedy aired in 1994. Recently, Mr. Wong received an Outer Critics Circle Award nomination for his portrayal of General Gong Fei in the Drama Dept’s production of Shanghai Moon. He made his Broadway debut in M. Butterfly, a play by David Henry Hwang. His work, in arguably the breakthrough performance of that season, earned him the Outer Critics Circle Award, Theatre World Award, Drama Desk Award, Clarence Derwent Award, and the coveted Antoinette Perry (Tony) Award. No other actor has won all five of these awards for one role in a Broadway play. In addition to his substantial work Off-Broadway and in American regional theatre, he received critical acclaim for his performance in the Broadway revival of You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown as the intellectual, blanket-dependent Linus. B.D. Wong has worked on more than twenty films, among them: Jurassic Park, The Freshman, The Ref, Executive Decision, and the current CastleRock release, The Salton Sea. Moviegoers may perhaps remember him most vividly for his diverse work in Seven Years in Tibet, Father of the Bride (Parts I and II), and as the voice of the heroic “Shang” in Disney’s animated hit, Mulan. Mr. Wong feels that living day to day in the trenches of a challenging career as an actor (a vocation in an industry fraught with racism-based rejection) has forced him to not only empower himself and his own self esteem, but has helped him to be facile and articulate about the issues of racial self-image, Asian-American parental pressure, and the “model minority myth.” He enjoys a second career traveling to colleges, universities, high schools, and diversity-themed conferences to share his point of view. Among other awards he has received are those from the AALDEF (Asian-American Legal Defense and Education Fund), AAPAA (Association of Asian-Pacific American Artists), the Coro Foundation, the Chinese Performing Arts Foundation, the Asian AIDS Project, the Asian Pacific Council, the Chinese Culture Foundation of San Francisco, the Manhattan Borough Community College, and the Crane House of Louisville, Kentucky. He received a 2001 “Ammy” Award, sponsored by A Magazine, for Best Male Actor in a Televised Production for his work on OZ. B.D. Wong was born and raised in San Francisco, and currently resides in New York City.
 
Credits

Actor
Production Theatre Opened Credit
1 Shanghai Moon Greenwich House 01/15/2003 General Gong Fei
2 As Thousands Cheer Greenwich House 06/02/1998 N/A
3 A Language of Their Own Joseph Papp Public Theater/ Susan Stein Shiva Theater 04/04/1995 Ming
4 The Tempest Union Square Theatre 10/25/1989 Ariel a spirit
Awards
Award Production Function
1 NOMINATED 2003 Outer Critics Circle Award, Outstanding Featured Actor in a Play Shanghai Moon Actor